Columbia south america dating site


31-Oct-2016 08:56

As of the 2014-15 school year, the school had an enrollment of 1,913 students and 146.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.1:1.

There were 359 students (18.8% of enrollment) eligible for free lunch and 114 (6.0% of students) eligible for reduced-cost lunch.

The close of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th brought significant changes in high school curriculum and school management.

The Board of Education had by now replaced the old Board of Trustees. By 1891, sciences had been added to the course of study.

By 1877, the old two-story wooden building erected in 1815 was found to be woefully inadequate for the growing community. The building later became the northeast wing of the old South Orange Junior High School, demolished when the present middle school was built.

One resident complained that "in very cold weather, with stoves at red heat, it is impossible to raise the temperature in the room above 55 degrees, and in such a place are sown the seeds of suffering, disease and death." The Trustees responded in 1879 by resolving to erect a new brick building, of two stories, to accommodate between 220 and 240 pupils. The separate existence of the high school began in 1885, when the Trustees decided "that in order to increase the efficiency of the Columbia School a new class of a higher grade shall be formed at the commencement of the coming term to be taught by the Principal." Lower grades continued to be housed at Columbia.

Since the days of the Revolution, a one-room stone schoolhouse had stood on a grassy area known as the Common, located close to the present intersection of South Orange Avenue and Academy Street in Maplewood.

In 1814, this building blocked the construction of a new toll highway from Newark to Morristown.

Many students and teachers were enlisted during World War I, which had a significant effect on life at Columbia.

Pupils in assembly regularly delivered patriotic "four-minute speeches." Every room in the school had a full complement of war posters. Polio spread around the country in 1916 and, at Columbia, resulted in the deaths of one teacher and several children.